Tag Archives: Luke 9

Feeding the Five Thousand Lesson

Feeding the Five Thousand

[Matthew 14:15-21, Mark 6:35-44, Luke 9:12-17, John 6:4-13]

Beyond the Text

  • What fish did Jesus feed to the people?
    • The Bible doesn’t say and scholars don’t know. Legend has it that the fish was Tilapia, also known as “St. Peter’s Fish.”
  • What about the Feeding of Four Thousand? Is it the same?
    • Matthew 15:32-38 and Mark 8:1-9 contains a story of the Feeding the Four Thousand in Decapolis. Though some people believe this is another account of the Feeding the Five Thousand, most agree it is a different event. This event describes seven loaves of bread and two fish.
  • The Feeding the Five Thousand is the only miracle to appear in all four Gospels besides the Resurrection.
  • The Bible says there were 5,000 men. This number does not include the women and children. Most scholars believe there was likely 15,000 people fed during this miracle.
  • What was eight months of a man’s wages?
    • The eight months of a man’s wages is about two hundred denarii. A denarius was a day’s wage for a laborer.

Discussion

When it was getting late, what did the disciples want to do with the crowds?

What was Jesus’ response to the disciples?

When Jesus told the disciples “You give them something to eat,” what was the response from the disciples?

The boy provided five loaves and two fish. What did Jesus do? What did the disciples do?

When you have a need, do you try to meet the need? Do you trust God to meet the need? Do you trust God to do the impossible?

This event shows us Jesus provides to the disciples and then they provide to the crowd. How is that similar to what we do as good stewards? As ministers of the Good News? How is this similar for both physical needs and spiritual needs?

The disciples wanted to send the people away but Jesus wanted to take care of their needs. The passage before the Feeding of Five Thousand speaks about something Jesus had for the people. What was this trait? How does it help us to meet the needs of others?

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The Transfiguration of Jesus

[Matthew 17:1-13, Mark 9:2-13, Luke 9:28-36]

Chronologically in the Bible, before the Transfiguration, we read that Peter recognizes Jesus as “the Christ, the Son of the living God” (Matthew 16:16b NIV). After Peter’s identification of Jesus as the Christ, we read about the prophecy of the church – the well-known statement, “you are Peter, and on this rock I will build My church.” Following this prophecy, Jesus speaks to the disciples about the crucifixion and resurrection. Then Jesus, with the Three, headed up to a high mountain.

The Three were Peter, James, and John. They were the first to hear the call of Jesus (Mark 1:16-19). They were present during the healing of the daughter of Jairus, though the others were excluded (Luke 8:51). The Three were invited to come along with Jesus when He went to pray in the Garden of Gethsemane. (Matthew 26:30-46, Mark 14:26-42, Luke 22:39-46).

High mountains are associated with closeness to God and a readiness to receive His Word. We do not know the exact mountain where the Transfiguration occurred; however, many scholars believe it might have been Mount Hermon. We read about God directing Moses to go up a mountain (Mount Sinai) for Him to give Him the Law (Exodus 24:12-18). We read about Elijah going to Mount Horeb where He encounters the presence of God (1 Kings 19:8-18).

God’s voice echoes the same words on the mountain as spoken during the baptism of Jesus. “This is My Son, whom I love; with Him I am well pleased” (Matthew 3:17 NIV). “This is My Son, whom I love; with Him I am well pleased. Listen to Him!” (Matthew 17:5 NIV).

1) What is Peter’s focus when Moses and Elijah join Jesus?

2) When we see the glory of God, what should be our response?

3) What do Moses and Elijah represent?

4) Is John the Baptist Elijah?

5) Why did Jesus tell the disciples not to tell anyone about what they saw?

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