Tag Archives: prophet Elisha

Full to Brim

I love reading 2 Kings 4, with the stories of Elisha and the poor woman, as well as the rich woman who makes a room for Elisha the prophet to come and stay. The story of the poor woman with two children reminds me of my own personal story. The woman has lost her husband and she is responsible for two children.

She takes her needs to God from what we glean from the text. She approaches Elisha and tells him her current situation, and the possibility that the creditors would take her sons as slaves as they have threatened. Elisha first asks, “What can I do to help you,” but then wants to know what the woman has in her home. She answers, “Nothing at all, except a flask of olive oil.” Read that again. First she says, “Nothing at all.” But then she continues EXCEPT a flask of olive oil. The woman didn’t have much, but she had a flask of olive oil.

Elisha tells her to have her sons collect empty jars from the neighbors. Then they are commanded to shut the door and pour the oil into the empty jars. We read that EVERY container is full—and not just full, but FULL TO THE BRIM. There was no more room for anything more. God provided and He did so in abundance. Today, remember that we serve a big God. Quit focusing on the “nothing at all” and press onward. Quit settling for good things when you were made for GREAT things. Dive into His Word, fall upon your knees, and allow Him to speak life into your dry bones. Allow Him to get you back on the narrow path, re-energized and refocused.

“Soon every container was full to the brim! ‘Bring me another jar,’ she said to one of her sons. ‘There aren’t any more!’ he told her. And then the olive oil stopped flowing.” – 2 Kings 4:6 [NLT]

 

All Is Well

All is well. Shalom. That is what we read in 2 Kings 4 twice—both times from the Shunammite’s mouth. The prophet Elisha passed by her home often and the Shunammite wanted to make a room for him. What an awesome gesture to make a room for the man of God. If only we each made room like that for God in our lives.

The Shunammite was blessed by God with a son but one day while the son was with his father, he fell ill and died. The Shunammite woman had her son carried to the bed of the man of God. He was laid on the bed and she left. As she saddled the donkey, she was asked why she was headed to Elisha on this day. She said, “ALL IS WELL.” When she came upon Gehazi, she again said, “ALL IS WELL,” before she fell at Elisha’s feet.

All is well. Shalom. The word means completeness or peace. What a great thought—peace! But how can one have peace when their son lay dead?!? How can a person say, “All is well” when it doesn’t appear that everything is okay? This woman was without a son for so very long and now her prized son was dead. All is well. Shalom. Why? Because she had her eyes fixed on God and she allowed Him to move into her house and into her life. Her circumstances might have been painful, but all was well. She loved and feared the God of the impossible. He moved into her home—and he moved in her life. So too He can in yours. As the hymnist Horatio Spafford wrote, “It is well, it is well with my soul.”

“And he said, ‘Why will you go to him today? It is neither new moon nor Sabbath.’ She said, ‘All is well’ … Run at once to meet her and say to her, ‘Is all well with you? Is all well with your husband? Is all well with the child?’ And she answered, ‘All is well.’” – 2 Kings 4:23, 26 [ESV]