Tag Archives: Psalm 86

Do Only Good

God is good. Always. The Psalmist declares this and it is true. God is good, “and ready to forgive, and abundant in lovingkindness to all who call upon (Him)” (Psalm 86:5 NLT). “The LORD is good; His lovingkindness is everlasting and His faithfulness to all generations” (Psalm 100:5 NLT).

Not only is God good, but He does only good. You may hear someone say otherwise or you may think otherwise at times. Understand God is good and He cannot do anything that is not good. He is good. Goodness comes from Him. He only can do good. When something not good is happening, He may have allowed it but He did not cause it.

God uses everything for His good purpose. Remember Romans 8:28: “And we know that God causes everything to work together for the good of those who love God and are called according to his purpose for them” (NLT). If you are going through something right now, trust that He will use it for His good purpose. He is faithful. You are not alone.

“You are good and do only good; teach me Your decrees.” – Psalm 119:68 [NLT]

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More Than a Story: Compassion

[The Good Samaritan: Luke 10:25-37]

Compassion – Deep awareness of the sufferings or misfortunes of another with a desire to relieve it.

Verse 37 – And he said, “The one who showed mercy toward him.” Then Jesus said to him, “Go and do the same.” [NASB]

Mercyeleos (el’-eh-os) – pity, mercy, compassion, tender mercy, kindness

Samehomoiós (hom-oy’-oce) – In like manner, similarly, in the same way, equally

Psalm 86:15“But you, O Lord, are a God of compassion and mercy, slow to get angry and filled with unfailing love and faithfulness.” [NLT]

CompassionRachum – (rakh-oom’) – compassionate, full of compassion

Jesus expressed compassion to:

  • Weary (Matthew 11)
  • Tempted (Hebrews 2)
  • Helpless (Mark 9)
  • Sorrowful (Luke 7)
  • Multitudes (Matthew 15)

 Zechariah 7:9“Thus says the LORD of hosts, Render true judgments, show kindness and mercy to one another.” [ESV]

Colossians 3:12 – “Therefore, God’s chosen ones, holy and loved, put on heartfelt compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness, and patience.” [HCSB]

“Until he extends the circle of his compassion to all living things, man will not himself find peace.” – Albert Schweitzer

Bible Study Questions:

1) Before the Parable was told, Jesus was tested by a lawyer. The lawyer answered correctly about the Law (v. 27). He knew what God’s Word said. Jesus said, “Do this, and you will live.” What was the “do this”?

2) The lawyer intended to justify himself and asked, “Who is my neighbor”? In the last verse of the passage, Jesus asks him who was his neighbor. Which fellow from the Parable was the neighbor? What did he do for the man?

3) What did the compassionate fellow do for the man that can remind us of the unfailing, unending compassion of our God? (See verse 35)

4) What do you think it means to be compassionate toward someone? Was there a time in your life when you did this to another? Was there a time when someone showed compassion to you?

5) Jesus showed compassion to all people, and these people each lived in various circumstances. How can we show compassion to the

  • Weary –
  • Tempted –
  • Helpless –
  • Sorrowful –
  • Multitudes –

more than a story

More Than A Story is a 12-week Sermon Series and Bible Study focused on the parables of Jesus.

Richness
Forgiveness
Persistence
Fruitfulness
Obedience
Humility
Compassion
Responsiveness
Repentance
Readiness
Faithfulness
Kingdom-Focused

What is Truth

Matthew 27 / Mark 15 / Luke 23 / John 18-19

 Pontius Pilate – Roman Governor –Procurator.

  • He was in charge of appointing the high priest and controlling the Temple and funds.
  • He had full control of the province.
  • He had full powers of life and death as he could reverse capital sentences passed by Sanhedrin.
  • He had a bad reputation with Jews and Samaritans.
  • He was guilty of slander, robbery, violence and murder – and at least twice was called to account by the Roman imperial authority.
  • Because people threatened Pilate, that they would inform the emperor that Pilate hadn’t eliminated a rebel against Rome, Pilate went against what he knew was right. He didn’t do the right thing.
  • He was later removed from his office for unnecessary and brutal treatment of his subjects.
  • Pagan historians only mention Pilate when mentioning his authorization of the death of Jesus (Tacitus).
  • Historians documented that Pilate was forced to commit suicide during reign of Gaius (AD 37-41).

 1) DISCOVER THE TRUTH – What is Truth?

Jesus told Pilate, “In fact, the reason I was born and came into the world is to testify to the truth” John 18:37 (NIV). The question that Pilate and many others have asked is “what is truth?” (v. 38 NIV). The Bible mentions the word “truth” over two hundred times. God revealed truth to us through Jesus. Jesus says in John 14:6 that He is “the way and the truth and the life” (NIV).

I believe absolute truth is God’s truth. The Bible is God’s Word and God’s Word is Truth. The Bible says that God cannot lie (Titus 1:2), which therefore means that He speaks only what is true. The Psalmist writes “Teach me your ways, O LORD, that I may live according to your truth” (Psalm 86:11a NLT). God is the source of all truth. I believe Jesus is “the way and the truth and the life” and I believe that Jesus is infinite, living Truth.

When we read the garden scene in Genesis 3, it is quite clear that God presents absolute truth with regard to this tree of knowledge of good and evil to Adam and Eve. Satan challenges God’s truth, and deceives Adam and Eve into questioning what God says as well. Even today, Satan attempts to get us to challenge God’s Truth, to ask “did God really say” when we encounter His Truth. God’s Truth does not change; though we may attempt to misrepresent or skew His Truth, it still remains as Truth, as absolute reality. We can choose to accept His Truth and live by it, or to deny it and live as a fool, lost and wandering in search for another alternative which just is not there.

Some people believe that there is truth and it can be found through science and logic. Anything claimed of God that has no scientific or logically basis is not seen as being true. Other people reject the idea of absolute truth and believe that what may be true for one person is not necessarily what is true for another person. Truth is what we make it to be and we each will find our own truth. That means one person can claim God to be God and that is seen as Truth for that person. Another person may claim that there are three gods and that is truth for that particular person.

Many people will spend their lives asking the same question as Pilate, and will never get the true answer because they are seeking for answers in the wrong place. I cling to the promise found in John 16:13, “But when he, the Spirit of Truth, comes, He will guide you into all the truth” (NIV). Only through a relationship with God, as a result of Christ’s redemption and the working of the Holy Spirit are we able to understand Truth. If only Pilate realized that he was speaking to the Truth, he would have seen the answer was right before him.

Truth is God’s Truth

Jesus is God’s Truth – John 1 says Jesus is full of grace and TRUTH.

God’s Word is Truth (John 17:17) – We find truth when we read & study the Bible. We need the belt of Truth in place (Ephesians 6:14)

We are to correctly handle/explain God’s Truth (2 Timothy 2:15)

To be a disciple of Christ, you must continue in His Word and you will KNOW the truth and the truth will SET YOU FREE. (John 8:32)

 Pilate said, “So you are a king?” Jesus responded, “You say I am a king. Actually, I was born and came into the world to testify to the truth. All who love the truth recognize that what I say is true. – John 18:37 [NLT]

Every child of God knows the truth as Jesus, and is on the side of truth, and stands by it.

Pilate avoided the truth:

  1. Tried to get out of the situation?                             Sent Jesus to Herod (Luke 23:6-17)
  2. Tried to get someone to side with him?
  3. Tried to put responsibility on someone else – Told Jews “judge by your own law” – a mockery (John 18:31)
  4. Tried to escape – offer to release “criminal” (John 18:39)
  5. Tried to washed his hands – though it didn’t cancel guilt (Matthew 27:24)
  6. Tried to compromise – Had Jesus flogged (John 19:1-3)
  7. Tried to appeal to sympathy – Shall I kill your King? (John 19:15)

All this despite Pilate never having doubt of Jesus’ innocence – 3 x’s said NOT GUILTY!

2) DOING THE RIGHT THING EVEN WHEN IT COSTS EVERYTHING

When you know the Truth – then you must make a choice – what will you do with the Truth?

James 1:23-24 speaks about person who stares in the mirror and walks away, forgetting what he looks like. The mirror becomes useless after you walk away from it. James was saying that if we simply hear the word but don’t act, it’s useless just like the mirror.

St. Augustine said, “Wrong is wrong even if everyone is doing it. Right is right even if no one is doing it.”

Right choice could mean

          Social Rejection / Career Loss / Public Ridicule

“Teach me your ways, O LORD, that I may live according to your truth” (Psalm 86:11a NLT).

Here’s my heart, Lord

Speak what is true

Here’s my life, Lord

Speak what is true

Angry Like Jonah

We all have moments when we are angry. Jonah got angry. He wasn’t angry because the boat ride was shaky. He wasn’t upset that he was swallowed by a fish. He was irritated by the fact that God showed compassion on Nineveh. Jonah was sent to tell the people of Nineveh to change their ways, and he ran at first, because he did not think they deserved the grace and mercy of God. It upset him that people who were so evil would be given the opportunity to repent and be forgiven.

We all are undeserving of the love, the grace, the mercy, the compassion that God shows for us. Jonah recognized that God was “a gracious and compassionate God, slow to anger and abundant in lovingkindness, and one who relents concerning calamity” (4:2 NASB). Jonah saw all this good in God, and yet he did not immediately follow God’s instructions. Why?

There are often moments in life when we are not so easily supportive of God showing His grace and mercy on others. It is difficult for us to see people who have destroyed the lives of so many, and know that God has forgiven them. We believe our wrongs, our sins aren’t as bad as the sins of others. Why should someone who abused his wife and threw away his marriage and his children receive the same love from God as a “good Christian” who only lied a bit and missed a few church services? Why should someone who committed murder be shown the same love as someone who only took a tank full of gasoline from the local station?

These are tough questions that are sometimes difficult for us to accept and to keep ourselves from asking. We know the answer. Jonah knew the answer. God is gracious. He is compassionate. He is “abundant in lovingkindness.” But it made Jonah angry. Nineveh was filled with bad people. Why should they be forgiven for all they did simply by changing their ways and following God?

There should not be any question for us to ask except one. Why has God sent His one and only Son to be our Substitute and pay for our sins for we are unworthy? The answer, again, is that He is a compassionate, gracious God. He shows us grace– which is a gift– and we have no say on who He does and does not show His grace. Remember the parable of vineyard workers, where the workers who were there all day were paid the same as those who came to work late? “Take what is yours and go, but I wish to give to this last man the same as to you. Is it not lawful for me to do what I wish with what is my own? Or is your eye envious because I am generous?” (Matthew 20:14-15 NASB).

Jonah did not appreciate the generosity of God. God asked Jonah if he had a good reason to be angry. He didn’t. He actually told God that death was better than life. Jonah thought rather than see God show compassion on those he thought were undeserving, it would be better to be dead. That is a lot of anger to have simply because God was gracious to people. I wonder if there are times when we also get a bit upset at His graciousness, at His mercy.

I pray that if you are angry today, that you may take the time and steps needed to give it to God and let it go. I pray that you are able to “take what is yours” and move onward. God gives us the greatest gift of all. I pray that we never lose sight of that great gift, and that we continue to offer a heart of gratitude toward our loving, compassionate, gracious Father.

“For You, Lord, are good, and ready to forgive, and abundant in lovingkindness to all who call upon You… You, O Lord, are a God merciful and gracious, slow to anger and abundant in lovingkindness and truth.”
– Psalm 86:5, 15 [NASB]

I recommend reading this wonderful article “What Do I Do If I’m Angry With God?” written by Alexandrea J. Wilson, founder and director of the Mt. Ephraim Center, for some great insight.