Tag Archives: speak

Saying Nothing

In King Lear, William Shakespeare wrote, “No, I will be the pattern of all patience; I will say nothing.” I have considered my personal experience and the challenge to “say nothing.” We don’t like to not say a word. When someone comes up to us and says something that differs from what we think, we like to share what we think. When someone does something that goes against what we hold dear, we like to bring it to their attention. When words are said against us, we want to speak up and defend ourselves. We want to speak our mind or as we say, “Share our side.” When we see injustice or are on the receiving end of injustice, we feel the need to say something. When someone passes us while driving or accidentally bumps us with their shopping card, we might desire to open our mouths.

Proverbs 21:23 says, “Watch your tongue and keep your mouth shut, and you will stay out of trouble” (NLT). Is it really that easy? To say nothing, we certainly must have the patience Shakespeare noted. We also must be confidently founded in Christ. We must be humble and not care what others like, but be focused on God.

It is not always best to be silent. There are some situations when we should be speaking up. But when we find ourselves in a situation where speaking is not going to be beneficial, we need to ask ourselves if it is good for the Kingdom? Will what we have to say represent God in the way He should be represented? Is this about Him or us? It is important to look at our motives for speaking up.

Let us pray like the Psalmist, “Set a guard over my mouth, LORD; keep watch over the door of my lips” (141:3 NIV). May our mouths glorify our Father with the words we speak.

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Take It All

Last night I was watching this television show that just began for what I believe is a week long program. Although I am not much of a television buff, I tuned in to this NBC show because of the title, “Take It All.” The show has contestants selecting unknown prizes from a screen or deciding to “steal” a gift from one of their fellow contestants. Whoever has selected the most valuable of the prizes moves on to the next round of play. The last round has the two final contestants facing off in a last standoff. Each contestant selects one small container which has some cash amount listed inside. Each contestant must make a selection which will determine if they keep the prizes they earned earlier, the cash that is in the container they just selected, and possibly even the other contestant’s prizes.

I sat and watched as the older gentleman the host called “Santa” told his opponent that he could be trusted, that because he believe God placed them both there for a reason and that they both could be blessed, that he would select to “keep mine.” If both contestants selected “keep mine” they would both take home what they had earned. If she decided to select “take it all,” but “Santa” said he would only “keep mine,” she would take it all. The contestant said she didn’t know if she could trust him. Earlier in the game he tried to take items from other contestants. She didn’t trust him. The last move of the game, she picked to “Take it All.” It could have been an issue of greed; however, she again and again said she did not trust this man because of what his actions showed earlier in the game.

I thought about what she said and also what he had proclaimed before the big decision was made by both contestants. He did stick with his word and selected to “keep mine.” And yet, this lady did not trust him because of his actions before, something I think happens with a lot of Christians. Whether we like it or not, as a Christian, we are a representative of Christ. If we spend some time doing things that are not well representing Christ, and then later try to say that we are to be trusted, people may not see the true Christ. I am not saying that this man was falsely representing Christ. What I am talking about here is trust. If we are to be witnessing to people, there is a relationship that is involved. If we show people two different parts of us, the true us and then a different us, how could a person trust us? How can a person be brought to Christ when shown such a difference?

The lady in the show won everything—the money and prizes she had, plus everything that the other man had earned. She truly did “take it all.” Although we are taught to not take everything, to be generous, we are also taught to be truthful, to be faithful, to be like Christ. If we are not real with people, when we finally tell them about Jesus, about what He did for our lives, for how good He is, people may have already decided long before by your actions that you were a dishonest person and your words will have little meaning.

Verses to consider:

“Therefore, having put away falsehood, let each one of you speak the truth with his neighbor, for we are members one of another.” – Ephesians 4:25 [ESV]

“They profess to know God, but by their deeds they deny Him.” – Titus 1:16a [NASB]

“Dear children, let us not love with words or tongue but with actions and in truth.” – 1 John 3:18 [NIV]

Simply Serve

    A fellow classmate brought up an interesting point today. He said that it was interesting that when John the Baptist was asked if he was Elijah, he denied it, but then Jesus said that John the Baptist was in fact Elijah. From this, he said that he felt that John the Baptist did not understand the “bigness” of his mission.

    I thought about it for awhile and it got me to consider how we serve. We always seem to want to do big things for God. When we look for something to do with the church, we want to be the next Peter or Paul or John. We want to be Elijah or David. We don’t imagine a small role, because if we serve, we want to serve big.

    The problem is that it is not our will and it is not about us at all. When we serve, we are serving God. It doesn’t matter how big or how small the matter. Did Peter or James know how big their roles would be for the early church? Did Paul realise that we would be studying His writings so many years to come? Were these men looking to be the biggest, or were they serving their awesome God? Were they filling the needs or were they trying to venture to be the most well known?

    When we serve, we serve out of love– love for our Father. We don’t know how many it will touch and what the impact will be in the end. We simply serve. God will use those who let Him. Let yourself be used. See what He does. You may not know how far your service reaches, and maybe it will be something small– but no matter how big or small the role, you are serving a loving Father. That is what matters. Open your hands– let Him fill them.

“As each one has received a special gift, empty it in serving one another as good stewards of the manifold grace of God. Whoever speaks, is to do it as one who is speaking the utterances of God; whoever serves is to do so as one who is serving by the strength which God supplies; so that in all things God may be glorified through Jesus Christ, to whom belongs the glory and dominion forever and ever. Amen.” – 1 Peter 4:10-11 [NASB]